yoga teacher

Restorative Yoga

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Restorative yoga is a form of yoga that seeks to find physical, mental and emotional relaxation.  There are props oh so many props, bolsters, blankets, blocks and many more.  I have been participating in several restorative yoga classes, usually when I am feeling extra stressed and have the need to be soothed. I have never left one of these classes feeling unfulfilled. I'm always glad that I went.

So, it was with some delight and trepidation that I was asked to be a regular teacher of a restorative class on a Sunday afternoon.  I said yes of course, then silently inside had a panic attack.  I have never taught one of these classes before and having a regular gig was just a little intimidating.

Thank goodness, I found a 30-hour training locally, what a godsend!  This training is giving me a framework for developing classes and learning more of the philosophy of this type of yoga.

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I have always said there are two prerequisites for doing restorative yoga, that is breathing and lying down!  But it is so much more, it’s about surrendering and enlightenment. In some of the faster paced yoga classes like Vinyasa and Hatha it’s about finding your edge and staying there.  Restorative is the complete opposite of this, it’s about finding your comfort level and relaxing using props or feeling support of the ground beneath you, it’s about meditation and slowing down in our fast-paced lives.

So off I went to teach my first class.  90 minutes…...whaaat!!  That’s an awfully long time to fill.  I had spent days putting together just the right mediation, researching restorative poses like a PhD student.

I was a bag of nerves when I arrived at the yoga studio, everything had to be right, the lighting, the music, the temperature of the room.

People started wandering in to take the class, yikes this is really happening I thought to myself.  We all got settled, I took a deep breath, invited everyone to close their eyes and started with a soothing meditation.  It was at that moment when I relaxed, threw all my expectations out of the window and decided just to be, just be present in the moment with my students and with myself.

The 90 minutes went by with comforting poses, feelings of trust and clarification and a deep support of the poses that were presented.  I felt like I was in my element, I had found my thing, and I was and am eternally grateful that all went well.

Now onto developing the next class and hopefully many more.

Life After Graduating as a Yoga Teacher

So, it’s been a few months since I graduated as a yoga teacher, starting to get in the flow.  I’ve had some awesome classes where I came out energized and really pumped. And I've had some other classes where I came out ready for the psychiatrist couch. But there are some key things I did in the process of becoming a teacher that may be useful to other new grads. 

Here's my list:

  • I got liability insurance.  The practice of yoga is very mindful, but it is a workout and as such, people have the potential of getting injured.  Therefore, you want to protect yourself in case a client screams blame.  Liability insurance is relatively cheap and I feel comforted by the fact that if the worst happened and I am sued, no one is going to get the house.
  • As soon as I started teaching, I started a 3-ring binder. In there I keep a copy of all my classes with comments on what worked and what did not. I also have the contact information of the different studios I work for.  Also, I am logging my teaching hours as when I get up to 1000 hours of teaching I can market myself as an Expert Yoga Teacher (EYRT).  This is also a place where I keep a record of all my expenses so I can do that dreaded spreadsheet every 3 months and pay my taxes like a good citizen (groan). 
  • Continue updating and creating new classes so they are on hand if I get that last-minute call.  YouTube is the champion of all resources for yoga sequences.  I have found this particularly useful for planning my kid’s classes.  In my future repertoire: Hungry Caterpillar Yoga, Harry Potter Yoga and Fairy Yoga.  It keeps the variety fresh and helps me not teach the same class over and over again, which can get quite monotonous.
  • Offer to be a teaching assistance.  I have done this several times now and it is invaluable for not only gaining my own confidence but watching how an experienced teacher creates that blissed out atmosphere in a yoga class and techniques and sequences they use for success.
  • Look ahead for future trainings to enhance your teaching.  I am already looking forward to a couple of trainings I would like to do, maybe yoga therapy, maybe a nutrition certificate which would help make me the complete health package.  This is a little in the future as for right now I am trying to get compensated for my teaching to recoup the cost of my teacher training before I commit any more money to more qualifications.
  • Maybe take some private classes with a yogi you respect and aspire to be.  I did this in April and it literally changed my practice.  To have a one on one to tell me put your foot here, your shoulders like this, your feet grounded etc. was beyond helpful in how I will develop my own practice and help others.

I see my initial qualification of Registered Yoga Teacher just the beginning of my journey, it’s fun, it's challenging, it's growth in progress and I think always will be.

Hope you found this helpful. Any other yogis out there who have some helpful hints?